What To Do if Your Church has Mold Problems?

Oct 31

What To Do if Your Church has Mold Problems?

If you are a regular church goer or are part of miscellaneous church activities such as Sunday school (for kids) or youth fellowship meetings, or even if you are attending marriage ceremonies, funerals or baptisms, you could be at a serious risk of being exposed to a mold infestation that could adversely affect your health as well as all others in attendance i.e. guests, visitors, members, priest / minister / rabbi and other church staff. Usually, this is the case when the church’s building has seen several decades without renovation and the prevailing environment has been moderately humid for a long time.

If you inhale in increased levels of airborne mold spores – even for as little as an hour (this is usually the time church services take) – there is a good chance that a mold colony growth could get initiated in your lungs and sinus cavity. Children, especially those who are allergic or are already suffering from an illness, are among those who are worst affected by this. In many cases, churchgoers are unable to pinpoint the church’s musty, nostalgic scented air as the culprit behind their predicament, which is why they spend thousands of dollars on medications and treatments that are useless – simply because they keep on going back to the source of the mold. A prime example of a church building that could be playing host to dangerous mold growths is one that has been damaged by a hurricane/storm and hastily repaired without its interior being adequately dried off: mold thrives in humidity – and the damp, musty corners of the church that don’t see the light of day are an ideal breeding ground for it.

If you experience breathing difficulties or exhaustion soon after you have left the church or even as the service is going on, you must immediately relay your concerns to the priest / minister / rabbi. With their consultation, you (or the church staff) could conduct a mold assessment using mold test kits in order to determine whether there is a mold infestation in the church or not. Be sure to check the air of the church sanctuary as well as other rooms and also in the external airflow from the cooling/heating duct registers. If the church has a cellar / basement, it goes without saying that this could be a very likely mold source. Compare the results of the tests to an outdoor control test. If there is any visible mold, you can collect samples from the mold growth using a ‘Scotch tape lift sampling technique’ that is described in most mold guide websites. Mold kits can be easily acquired from many large home improvement, safety or hardware store. If you are unable to purchase them on your own, you can ask the priest to set up a collection where everyone in the congregation can contribute – since it will be to the benefit of everyone ultimately. If the community agrees to contribute, you may even be better off hiring a professional mold assessor / remediator to get rid of the mold in a very reliable way. Just make sure that you have a good idea of how much the mold removal will cost and whether the contributions will suffice, since mold remediation is an expensive undertaking.

 

In any case mold should be handled by the professionals, like this company out of Edmonton:

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Brief History of the Anglican Society

May 08

Brief History of the Anglican Society

The name “Anglican” comes from the phrase “of England,” but Anglicanism has a global presence. To some historians, the Anglican Church dates all the way back to the 6th century, and the church evolved as part of the Roman Catholic faith. However, it branched off with Celtic influences and grew to be its own spirituality.

The Church of England began to expand during the post-reformation period. Anglicans trace their Christian history back to these ancestral roots of the early church. There were initially two stages in development and further expansion of the church. Starting in the 17th century, Anglicanism combined with the colonization in several territories including the United States, Canada, Australia, South Africa and New Zealand. Secondly, another stage started in the 18th century as missionaries traveled to Latin America, Africa and Asia to establish Anglican churches across the world.

The Anglican church is different from the Roman church, but the split was most obvious in 1054 when Anglicans split from the Roman administration. In subsequent years, the church continued to develop on its own, and various conflicts arose as the church established itself as the Church of England.

There was a major eruption in England between the church and state, which can be traced back to the arrival of Augustine. This conflict continued to brew further problems for England. The murder of Archbishop Thomas Becket was seen as a major schism, and he became a martyr both for the Anglican Church and Roman Catholic Church. The Magna Carta signed by King John contained 63 points. Signed in 1215, the first of these points stated that the English church was independent of its government.

At the start of the 16th century, the Roman Church and Church of England suffered further conflicts. Martin Luther published his famous 93 theses and nailed them to the door of the Church in Wittenburg at this time. This was seen as a threat, and 20 years later, the Anglican part of the church challenged the authority of the Roman Catholic church. Henry VIII took it a step further and dissolved abbeys and monasteries in 1536, which only heightened the tension. While many would believe that King Henry did this out of spite when the Pope refused to grant him a divorce, history shows that Henry had spent almost his entire reign challenging the Roman Church and its authority. The divorce was just another problem that made the split more obvious.

As the new Anglican church was established, it developed a formal structure under the reign of Elizabeth I in 1562. Her structure was not government or management processes. Rather, she wanted a church that brought its people together with shared traditions and beliefs. These traditions were taken from the Holy Bible and Articles of Religion, and much of it is composed in the Book of Common Prayer. The first Book of Common Prayer was released in 1549 and was translated into English from Latin. While the Common Prayer has been revised several times, the beliefs and traditions still remain the same.

Despite splitting away from the Roman Catholic church, Anglican followers still held many of the same beliefs and continued to practice Roman Catholic traditions. In the first part of the 17th century, the Church of England, Church of Ireland and churches in the American colonies all practiced worship that combined perspectives from Roman Catholicism and Reformed Protestantism.

After the American Revolution, Anglican churches in America and Canada formed their own systems and named their own bishops. They had self-governing administrations. Christian missions were established to help newly formed churches and ventured into parts of the Pacific, Africa and Australia. It wasn’t until the 19th century that the term “Anglicanism” actually came into existence and described the religious traditions held by the churches in England and the Americas.

Today, there isn’t a single Anglican Church with a universal authority. Each country and region has their own systems of governance. However, there is the See of Canterbury and the Archbishop of Canterbury, which unifies the churches together. He calls the Lambeth Conference every 10 years is the President of the Anglican Consultative Council. The Anglican Communion has 80 million members and ranks third among Christian communions in the world.

Photo credits: CircaSassy

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Helping A Friend In Need

May 08

Having friends means being there to enjoy the good times and support them in trying times. Helping a friend in need is one of the kindest acts of generosity you can give to another person. Letting your friend know they are not alone and do not have to bear the brunt of their burdens by themselves can help make stressful situations less taxing and frightening. There are many ways you can help a friend in need and many of them are simple, take just a few minutes and can make a real difference to your friend without causing a hardship on you.

Say A Prayer On Your Friend’s Behalf

Offer a prayer of support and care for your friend. If your friend is a person of faith, offer to pray with them. Sharing prayer can help strengthen your bond and affirm your faith. Often after spending time in prayer, people feel renewed and have a sense of hope. If your friend is not a person of faith, offer prayers on their behalf. If you are a member of a church, place your friend’s name on your prayer list and let the power of prayer uplift your friend in their time of need.

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Finding Jesus

May 08

Finding Jesus

It isn’t always easy to find your path, especially when you don’t know exactly what it is you are looking for. If you need the perfect example of that, you can consider my story. I was someone who was lost on the path of life, not knowing quite where to look. But after finding Jesus, I was able to get on the path that led me to a road of glory that has now changed my life.

Throughout my life, I never had the right direction or understanding of where to go. Because of this, I often found myself in places that I was uncomfortable with, and that I knew I shouldn’t have been in. I guess you could say that I ran with the wrong circles, which resulted in me making plenty or wrong decisions. Those decisions hurt everyone around me, even though at the time I didn’t realize it.

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Church Planting in the Anglican Mind

May 07

Church Planting in the Anglican Mind

When it comes to spreading the word of God and extending His love, one of the most exciting initiatives that I can think of is church planting. Church planting is exactly what it sounds like, and it occurs when an established church essentially uses its resources to set up a church in an area that needs it. Though the term itself is new, there is some evidence to show that this practice has been going on since the start of Christianity, when the Christian faith spread from Judea to distant Samaria.

Though Christianity is often spread to the persecution of Christians as they needed to flee from place to place, we should not underestimate the effect of a planned ministry. In distant times, church planting was something that actually went forth into the wilderness, but today, we find that it has more in common with opening a franchise, an analogy that I think is both correct and amusing.

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